The U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation is investigating a report by a U.S. cybersecurity firm that it uncovered some 1.2 billion Internet logins and passwords amassed by a Russian crime ring, the largest known collection of such stolen data. Hold Security of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, disclosed earlier this month that it had discovered the credentials, collected over several years from approximately 420,000 websites and other servers.

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Russian President Vladimir Putin, concerned with how social media can be used to undermine his authority, this month expanded his regulation of media to the blogosphere, requiring those with at least 3,000 daily readers to register their real names and contact information. So far, about 580 bloggers in Russia have applied to register with the country’s communications regulator Roskomnadzor.

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Google plans to offer accounts to children under 13 years old for the first time, a move that will take the world’s largest Internet search provider into a controversial and operationally complex new market. Accounts on Google services such as Gmail and YouTube are not officially offered to children, though there is little to stop them from logging on anonymously or posing as adults to sign up for accounts.

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Google Inc. and other critics of a European Union court ruling that created a right to be forgotten on the Internet are exaggerating it to undermine a reform of data-protection rules, the EU’s justice chief said. Search engines such as Google “complain loudly” about the ruling and such critics are using “distorted notions of the right to be forgotten to discredit” a planned reform of EU data-protection rules that includes the right, Martine Reicherts, the EU’s justice commissioner, said in a speech in Lyon, France.

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Uber, the smartphone-based car service, won a reprieve when a local court in Berlin suspended a ban from the city’s authorities, who had ruled that Uber did not comply with passenger safety standards. The court will now weigh whether Uber, which has been valued at roughly $17 billion and operates in more than 100 cities in 36 countries, can legally operate in the German capital.

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