American officials have concluded that North Korea was “centrally involved” in the hacking of Sony Pictures computers, even as the studio canceled the release of a far-fetched comedy about the assassination of the North’s leader that is believed to have led to the cyberattack. Senior administration officials, who would not speak on the record about the intelligence findings, said the White House was debating whether to publicly accuse North Korea of what amounts to a cyberterrorism attack.

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In a remarkable shift, the Obama administration and the Castro government agreed to a series of moves aimed at opening up Cuba to real, high-speed, Internet access. Cuba and the United States, the White House said, have agreed to begin allowing communications devices and telecommunications services to move between the two countries.

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Government investigators fear the hackers behind the unprecedented attack on Sony’s Hollywood studio may never be caught if they are under the protection of North Korea, a U.S. official said. The law enforcement official, who declined to be identified because the investigation is ongoing, said authorities will require significant time to definitively confirm their suspicions that North Korea sponsored the attack, which severely damaged the movie studio’s network.

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A so-called spearphishing attack on ICANN has compromised the email credentials of several ICANN staff members and allowed the attacker access to user information, including email and postal addresses. The targeted phishing attack also allowed the attacker to gain access to all files in ICANN’s Centralized Zone Data System (CZDS), a centralized point for interested people to request access to so-called zone files provided by participating top level domains.

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A U.S. judge has allowed a Seattle artist’s intellectual property lawsuit to go forward over her claims she was cheated out of possibly millions of dollars from the sale of “Angry Birds” pet toys she designed, her attorney said. U.S. District Judge Robert Lasnik denied a motion by pet toy maker Hartz Mountain Corp to dismiss the lawsuit.

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