The Ebola epidemic has migrated online, where cybercriminals are using the virus to infect more people with malware. First, the United States Computer Readiness Team, a division of the Department of Homeland Security, issued an advisory warning users about spam campaigns that used the Ebola virus to bait users into clicking on malicious web links or attachments. Now, Trustwave, a private security and compliance consulting company, discovered several Ebola-themed threats.

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The story of Aereo, the streaming TV service that rattled the broadcast industry before the Supreme Court shut it down, is not over just yet it seems. A federal judge in New York slapped Aereo with an expected injunction, but also hinted how the service might survive in the future.

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The “anonymous” social media app Whisper has been summoned to Capitol Hill to answer questions posed by the powerful chair of the Senate commerce committee. Jay Rockefeller said revelations in the Guardian about how Whisper tracks its users raise “serious questions” over privacy and demanded an explanation.

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German publishers said they are bowing to Google’s market power, and will allow the search engine powerhouse to show news snippets in search results free of charge, at least for the time being. The decision is a step in an ongoing legal dispute between the publishers and Google.

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U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Patrick Leahy pressed large Internet providers to pledge that they will not strike deals that may help some websites load faster than others or give similar “fast lanes” to affiliated services. As regulators work on new so-called “net neutrality” rules, Leahy wrote to chiefs of AT&T Inc, Verizon Communications Inc, Time Warner Cable Inc and Charter Communications Inc.

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